Fischer on Teaching Legal Ethics

At Legal Ethics Forum, Prof. James Fischer of Southwestern speculates why students don’t respect their Legal Ethics course. He rejects the traditional rationales such as “(1) students lack real world experience; (2) the course is just a bunch of rules…

Law Students Nationwide Hate Their Career Placement Office

Law.com reports on a comprehensive survey of law students. Among the findings were that “63 percent of students said they received scant support in job placement.” I am surprised that the number is so low; I could have seen this…

Kaplan and Bar/Bri Alleged to Illegally Divide Market–Rodriguez v. West Publishing Corporation

Rodriguez v. West Publishing Corporation, CV05-3222 (C.D. Cal. complaint filed April 28, 2005). Explosive class-action antitrust lawsuit brought by Van Etten Suzumoto & Beckett against Kaplan and Bar/Bri alleging an illegal market-division agreement where West agreed to stay out of…

De Novo Blog on Law Reviews

De Novo blog ran a “symposium” on law review membership (Should you apply? General or specialty? etc.). Days 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. My contribution, with my typical cynicism and a small dose of optimism, is here.

Andrew Perlman on Law School Promotional Material

Over at Legal Ethics Forum, Andrew Perlman has challenged the prevailing standards for law school promotional materials. He calls on law schools to set an example for future lawyers by adhering to rigorous marketing standards akin to MR 7.1. I…

Gordon Smith on Law School Teaching Loads

Gordon Smith at Conglomerate has prepared an outstanding post listing the teaching loads at various law schools. His table shows overwhelmingly that the top-ranked law schools have moved to a new standard of 10 units/year as opposed to the more…

North Dakota Targets Professors With Foreign Accents

North Dakota is considering a law giving students certain rights if professors do not “speak English clearly and with good pronunciation”—and if enough students complain, stripping the professor of classroom duties. Two observations: · This is the most jingoistic proposal…

Steele on the State of Legal Education

John Steele organizes his thoughts into a thought-provoking post about the state of legal education. He concludes “Two trends that bother me: the use of citation counts and download counts as a proxy for the quality of education, and the…

Law Review Article Length Policies

Jim Gibson compiled the stated page length preferences of various law reviews (reposted with his permission—thanks Jim!): · California Law Review — is rethinking length policy; seems to prefer 40-70 pages · Columbia Law Review — will not review articles…

Lubet on Law School Exams

Professor Steven Lubet raises some provocative questions about law school exams. After recounting a story about how Chinese students chose to deal with a closed-book exam through brute force memorization (despite professor entreaties not to do so), Lubet asks the…